Team:Northwestern/Project/Apoptosis

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<td><a href="http://2010.igem.org/Team:Northwestern/Project/Modeling"><img width="100" class="icon" src="http://2010.igem.org/wiki/images/a/a7/NU_modeling.jpg"></a></td>
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<td><a href="http://2010.igem.org/Team:Northwestern/Project/Chassis"><img width="100" class="icon" src="http://2010.igem.org/wiki/images/a/a6/Nuchassis.jpg"></a></td>
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<td><a href="http://2010.igem.org/Team:Northwestern/Project/Lac"><img width="100" class="icon" src="http://2010.igem.org/wiki/images/1/18/Nulac.jpg"></a></td>
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<td><a href="http://2010.igem.org/Team:Northwestern/Project/Chitin Synthesis"><img width="100" class="icon" src="http://2010.igem.org/wiki/images/4/4e/Nuchitin.jpg"></a></td>
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<td align="center">Modeling</td>
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<td align="center">Chassis</td>
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<td align="center">Induction</td>
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<td align="center">Chitin</td>
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<td align="center">Apoptosis</td>
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Revision as of 15:53, 23 October 2010


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Modeling Chassis Induction Chitin Apoptosis

We used the Apoptosis Cassette by Brown '08 iGEM team (K124017).

The bacteriophage cassette includes S105 protein (Holin), R protein (Endolysin), and Rz protein, all of which act in combination to lyse the bacteria.

Holin is a small membrane protein that produces holes in the membrane.

R is an endolysin that digests and cleaves the cell wall.

Rz protein, a periplasmic protein, through reasons that are not yet totally clear, carries out the final step of host lysis.