Team:MIT phage context

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<li><a href="http://2010.igem.org/Team:MIT_tchara">Characterization</a></li>
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In 2006 the McGill team attempted to use leucine zippers fused to split YFP to display on cells and cause the cells to adhere via the split YFP.  See <a href="http://parts.mit.edu/wiki/index.php/McGill_University_2006">here</a>.</li>
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In 2006 the McGill team attempted to use leucine zippers fused to split YFP to display on cells and cause the cells to adhere via the split YFP.  See <a href="http://2006.igem.org/McGill_University_2006">here</a>.</li>
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Latest revision as of 01:05, 28 October 2010

Phage
hairy cells and polymerizing phage - context

WORK FROM OTHER IGEM TEAMS
The following teams have used some component of our phage system previously. No other teams have used our method of polyphage with incorporated coiled coils for polymerization (nor is it present in the literature).
  • In 2006 the McGill team attempted to use leucine zippers fused to split YFP to display on cells and cause the cells to adhere via the split YFP. See here.

  • The 2009 Freiburg Bioware team used Fos/Jun for a 'programmable enzyme' using Fok-fused Fos/Jun as factor in DNA cleavage. See here.

  • Paris's team in 2009 attempted to use Jun/Fos as a snare; Jun on signal vesicle, Fos on membrane of receiving cell. See here.

  • This year, Duke's team is using Jun- and Fos-based synthetic leucine zippers for genetic regulation. See here.


CROSS-LINKING IN THE LITERATURE
  • Willis et al. (2008) used external cross-linking agents and phage display to create phage polymer bundles as well as a 1cm^3 cube of polymerized phage.

  • Sweeney et al. (2007) used leucine zippers (ACID/BASE and Jun/Fos) on p3 and p9 to create linear arrays of phage up to 30 in length.

  • The Belcher lab has also been involved in using M13 to create assemblies, such as nanowires and rings. See Huang, et al. (2005) and Mao, et al. (2004).


RELEVANT LITERATURE
  • Rackonjac and Model. "Roles of pIII is Filamentous Phage Assembly". Journal of Molecular Biology. 1998.
  • Barbas III, et al. "Phage Display: A Laboratory Manual". Cold Spring Harbor Press. 2001.
  • Wang, et al. "Adapter-directed display: a modular design for shuttling display on phage surfaces". Journal of Molecular Biology. 2010.
  • Smith and Petrenko. "Phage Display". Chemical Review. 1997.
  • Sweeney, et al. "Assembly of Multimeric Phage Nanostructures Through Leucine Zipper Interactions". Biotechnology and Bioengineering. 2006.
  • Roth, et al. "A Minimized M13 Coat Protein Defines the Requirements for Assembly into the Bacteriophage Particle". Journal of Molecular Biology. 2002.
  • Weiss and Sidhu. "Design and Evolution of Artificial M13 Coat Proteins". Journal of Molecular Biology. 2000.
  • Branden and Tooze. "Introduction to Protein Structure". Garland Press. 1999.
  • Willis, et al. "Biologically templated organic polymers with nanoscale order". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. 2007.
  • Mao, et al. "Virus-based toolkit for the directed synthesis of magnetic and semiconducting nanowires". Science. 2004.
  • Huang, et al. "Programmable assembly of nanoarchitectures using genetically engineered viruses". Nano Letters. 2005.
  • Rondot, et al. "A helper phage to improve single-chain antibody presentation in phage display". Nature Biotechnology. 2001


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